The Empire Strikes Back – Unseen Vintage Documentary.

“Here’s an awesome vintage documentary short that lets us take a look back at the making of The Empire Strikes Back. While the film was shooting in the 80s, French journalist Michael Parbot was given unprecedented access to the production. Some of the footage has been seen in a couple of other documentaries over the years, but now there’s more unseen footage that’s been found! The doc includes fascinating conversations with Irvin Kershner, Mark Hamill, and Harrison Ford. Check it out.”

Games for the OCDs amongst us.

(…that includes me, btw).

Look at all these colors that need organizing…. mmMMmm… go-on, it won’t take a minute.

OCD Color Organization Game

These shapes and lines are all slightly wonky.  They need your help.  You can fix them.

OCD Eyeball Shapes & Lines Game

And of course, less interactively – everyone likes things organized neatly.

Seen others?  Let me know…   I won’t be happy until this list is complete.

SIGGRAPH Real-Time Live! 2013

Check out the 2013 RTL! trailer featuring some of the mind-blowing presentations from last years show, including Square Enix, AMD, BeautyPi and NaughtyDog.

Be a part of the show!

Every year since it’s inception, RTL! has featured technology from independent artists and engineers alongside products from billion dollar companies; it’s the diversity and quality of content that makes the show unique.  Don’t delay if you’re considering submitting; only one week left.

http://s2013.siggraph.org/submitters/real-time-live

What do you think cutting edge real-time graphics look like?  Let us know if you’ve seen something that should be on stage…  we’d love your ideas.

The Corridors of Lucasfilm #2 – Bell & Howell Splicer.

Bell & Howell SplicerBell & Howell SplicerBell & Howell Splicer

Bell & Howell is a U.S.-based former manufacturer of motion picture machinery, founded as Bell & Howell in 1907 by two projectionists, and headquartered in Wheeling, Illinois. According to its charter, Bell & Howell Company incorporated on February 17, 1907. It was duly recorded in the Cook County Record Book eight days later.

The splicer (above) was constructed to join together separate pieces of film, usually bonded by a specially formulated ‘film cement’.

Historically, Bell & Howell Co. was an important supplier of many different media technologies, starting with a rotary framer on 35mm film projectors in 1907.  This was quickly followed by a 35mm film perforator (1908), a professional 35mm motion-picture film camera (1909) and printing equipment used in motion-picture film laboratories introduced in 1911.  In 1934 Bell & Howell introduced the first light weight amateur 8-mm movie camera, in which the film was loaded in a cassette that allowed daylight loading and unloading.

For a brief period in the early eighties, Bell & Howell marketed a version of the Apple II in a black case to educational institutions.  The company merged with Böwe Systec Inc. in 2003; it was known as Böwe Bell & Howell until 2011, when Versa Capital Management bought the company and returned it to its original name.

(Text from Wikipedia).

The Computer Animation Festival 2013

Celebrating its 40th year, the world’s most innovative exploration of computer-generated animation and visual effects will be on display at SIGGRAPH 2013 in Anaheim, California this summer. The four-day, international event (21-25 July) spotlights the most prestigious innovators of technical and artistic short films. The festival showcases everything from student films to blockbuster visual effects and mainstream commercials.   Full Press Release | Computer Animation Festival

SIGGRAPH 2013 Computer Animation Festival

Star Wars Posters: Mashups

(Similar posts: Movie RedesignsRetro Travel & Propaganda).

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Be a Siggraph Student Volunteer

If you’re schooling in, or just interested in computer graphics and currently a student I can’t recommend this program enough.  The SVs make SIGGRAPH happen and I’ve never met one who didn’t have an amazing week.  But don’t take my word for it…

SV Program

Star Wars Posters: Adidas

Click on an image to view in gallery format.

(Similar posts: Movie RedesignsRetro Travel & Propaganda)

The Corridors of Lucasfilm #1 – Moviola.

There’s some beautiful old hardware hiding in the corners of the Lucasfilm Presido campus. It’s intriguing; although I learned to edit with film it wasn’t using gear anywhere nearly as incredible as this.  Infact, there’s a couple machines in the office I wasn’t entirely certain what they were for.  (But now I am – thanks Wikipedia).

This is the first in a short series of posts covering the gear I’ve discovered so far…

Moviola UD-20-S Moviola UD-20-S Moviola UD-20-S Moviola UD-20-S

The Moviola allowed editors to study individual shots in their cutting rooms, thus to determine more precisely where the best cut-point might be. The vertically-oriented Moviolas were the standard for film editing in the United States until the 1970s when horizontal flatbed editor systems became more common.

Iwan Serrurier’s original 1917 concept for the Moviola was as a home movie projector to be sold to the general public. The name was derived from the name “Victrola” since Serrurier thought his invention would do for home movie viewing what the Victrola did for home music listening (The Moviola even came in a beautiful wooden cabinet similar to the Victrolas). But since the machine cost $600 in 1920 (equivalent to $20,000 in the 2000s), very few sold. An editor at Douglas Fairbanks Studios suggested that Iwan should adapt the device for use by film editors. Serrurier did this and the Moviola as an editing device was born in 1924 with the first Moviola being sold to Douglas Fairbanks himself. Ninety four years later, a framed copy of the original receipt still resides at Moviola, the company, in Hollywood.

Many studios quickly adopted the Moviola including Universal StudiosWarner BrothersCharles Chaplin StudiosBuster Keaton ProductionsMary PickfordMack Sennett, and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. The advent of sound, 65mm and 70mm film, and the need for portable editing equipment during World War II greatly expanded the market for Moviola’s products.

Iwan Serrurier’s son, Mark Serrurier, took over his father’s company in 1946. In 1966, Mark sold Moviola Co. to Magnasync Corporation (a subsidiary of Craig Corporation) of North Hollywood for $3 million. Combining the names, the new name was Magnasync/Moviola Corp. President L. S. Wayman instantly ordered a tripling of production, and the new owners realized their investment in less than two years.

(Text from Wikipedia).

Star Wars Games Retrospective

Star Wars Games

From Flying to MMO, Action, Adventure and more, Star Wars Games have covered most genres. And now, for the first time they are all covered (from 1982-2008) in one video. Sit back and enjoy this epic collection of the Star Wars Retrospectives thanks to GameTrailers.com